Volume 7, Issue 2, April 2019, Page: 59-63
Removal of Sulphides and Benzene in Fluid Catalytic Cracking Gasoline by Insitu Hydrogenation Over NbFAPSO-5
Nchare Mominou, Department of Mining Engineering, University of Ngaoundere, Ngaoundere, Cameroon
Lei Wang, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai, China
Badohok Sarki, Department of Mining Engineering, University of Ngaoundere, Ngaoundere, Cameroon
Received: Mar. 15, 2019;       Accepted: Apr. 17, 2019;       Published: May 23, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajac.20190702.13      View  122      Downloads  10
Abstract
Niobium containing aluminophosphate molecular sieve (NbFAPSO-5) was hydrothermally synthesized with AlPO-5 type structure. Characterization of this catalyst was performed by X-ray diffraction to determine its structure, inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for its elemental composition and infrared spectrometry (IR) to access its acidic properties. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed well AlPO-5 type structure. ICP-AES analysis confirmed the incorporation of silicon (12.9%), aluminium (15.4%), phosphorous (21.9%), iron (5.62%) and niobium (0.39%) into AlPO-5 framework. Infrared spectrometry analysis showed that both Bronsted and Lewis sites were found in the synthesized sample. A fixed-bed reactor was used to investigate the activity of the resulting catalysts in the removal of sulfides and benzene in fluid catalytic cracking gasoline. Under suitable conditions of a metal loading of 15%, a reaction temperature of 423K, a reaction time of 30 min, a space velocity of 3 h-1, and a reaction pressure of 1 MPa; desulfurization and debenzolization ratios reach 100% and 19.9% respectively. Research octane number of the gasoline increased by two units. This remarkable behavior makes NbFAPSO-5 family, a potential candidate for industrial application as catalysts in the clean fuel.
Keywords
Niobium, NbFAPSO-5, Desulfurization, Debenzolization, Insitu Hydrogenation
To cite this article
Nchare Mominou, Lei Wang, Badohok Sarki, Removal of Sulphides and Benzene in Fluid Catalytic Cracking Gasoline by Insitu Hydrogenation Over NbFAPSO-5, American Journal of Applied Chemistry. Vol. 7, No. 2, 2019, pp. 59-63. doi: 10.11648/j.ajac.20190702.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Lee, K. X, Valla, J. A. (2017). Investigation of metal-exchanged mesoporous Y zeolites for the adsorptive desulfurization of liquid fuels. Appl. Catal. B-Environ, 201. 359–369.
[2]
Timko M. T., J. Wang, J. Burgess, (2016). Roles of surface chemistry and structural defects of activated carbons in the oxidative desulfurization of benzothiophenes, Fuel. 163 223–231.
[3]
Song C. S., X. L. Ma, (2004). Ultra-deep desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels: chemistry and process, Int. J. Green Energy 1.167–191.
[4]
Aziz F., M. Remi, S. Abdullah, T. Ihsan, A. Gasan,(2016). Pervaporative desulfurization of gasoline: a review, Chem. Eng. Process. 107.94–105.
[5]
Dokjampa S., Rirksomboon T., Phuong D., D. E. Resasco. (2007). Ring opening of 1, 3-dimethylcyclohexane on Ir catalysts: modification of product distribution by addition of Ni and K to improve fuel properties, J. Mol. Catal. A: Chem. 274.231–240.
[6]
Santikunaporn M., Alvarez W. E., Resasco D. E. (2007). Ring contraction and selective ring opening of naphthenic molecules for octane number improvement, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 325. 175–187.
[7]
Santana R. C., Do P. T., Santikunaporn M., Alvarez J. D., Taylor, Sughrue. (2006). Evaluation of different reaction strategies for the improvement of cetane number in diesel fuels, Fuel 85. 643–656.
[8]
Zepeda T. A., Pawelec B., León J., Reyes J., Olivas A.(2012). Effect of gallium loading on the hydrodesulphurization activity of unsupported Ga2S3/WS2catalysts, Appl. Catal. B: Environ. 112.10–19.
[9]
Song H. Y., Gao J. J., Chen X. Y., He J., Li C. H. X. (2013). Catalytic oxidation- extractive desulfurization for model oil using inorganic salts as oxidant and Lewis acid-organic acid mixture as catalyst and extractant, Appl. Catal. A-Gen. 456.67–74.
[10]
Sudhakar M., Vijay Kumar V., Naresh G., Lakshmi Kantam M., Bhargava S. K., Venugopal A., (2016). Vapor phase hydrogenation of aqueous levulinic acid over hydroxyapatite supported metal (M = Pd, PtRu, Cu, Ni) catalysts, Appl. Catal. B-Environ. 180.113–120.
[11]
Kumar S. A. K., John M., Pai S. M., Niwate Y., Newalkar B. L., (2014). Low temperature hydrogenation of aromatics over Pt-Pd/SiO2-Al2O3catalyst, Fuel Process. Technol. 128.303–309.
[12]
Bianchini C., Santo V. D., Meli A., Moneti S., Moreno M., Oberhauser W.(2003). A comparison between silica-immobilized ruthenium (II) single sites and silica-supported ruthenium nanoparticles in the catalytic hydrogenation of model hetero- and polyaromatics contained in raw oil materials, J. Catal. 213.47–62.
[13]
Ringelhan C., Burgfels G., Neumayr J. G., Seuffert W., Klose J., Kurth V.(2004). Conversion of naphthenes to a high value steam cracker feedstock using H-ZSM-5 based catalysts in the second step of the ARINO®-process, Catal. Today 97.277–282.
[14]
Raichle A., Traa Y., Fuder F., Rupp M., Weitkamp J., (2001). Haag-Dessau catalysts for ring opening of cycloalkanes, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 40.1243–1246.
[15]
Wang J., Yao Q. Li, J., (1999). The effect of metal–acid balance in Pt-loading dealuminated Y zeolite catalysts on the hydrogenation of benzene, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 184 181–188.
[16]
Weitkamp J., Raichle A., Traa Y., Rupp M., Fuder F.(2000). Preparation of synthetic steam cracker feed from cycloalkanes (or aromatics) on zeolite catalysts, Chem. Commun. 5.403–404.
[17]
Mévellec V., Roucoux A., Ramirez E., Philippot K., Chaudret B. (2004). Surfactant-stabilized aqueous iridium (0) colloidal suspension: an efficient reusable catalyst for hydrogenation of arenes in biphasic media, Adv. Synth. Catal. 346 72–76.
[18]
Julião D., Gomes A. C., Pillinger M., Luís C.-S., Castro. Balula S. S. (2015). Desulfurization of model diesel by extraction/oxidation using a zinc-substituted polyoxometalate as catalyst under homogeneous and heterogeneous (MIL-101(Cr) Encapsulated) conditions. Fuel Process. Technol. 131. 78–82.
[19]
Gupta M., He J., Nguyen T., Petzold F., Fonseca D., Jasinski J. B., Sunkara M. K.(2016) Nanowire catalysts for ultra-deep hydrodesulphurization and aromatic hydrogenation, Appl. Catal. B-Environ. 180 246–254.
[20]
Mévellec V., Roucoux A., Ramirez E., Philippot K., Chaudret B. (2004). Surfactant-stabilized aqueous iridium (0) colloidal suspension: an efficient reusable catalyst for hydrogenation of arenes in biphasic media, Adv. Synth. Catal. 346 72–76.
[21]
Gonzales and Delacruz,(1999). Computational Study of Substitution of Al by Fe3+ in the AlPO-5 Framework. Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 29. 361-365.
[22]
Wilson, Flanigen and Pfaff,(1982). Crystalline Metallophosphate Composition. USP 4310440.
[23]
Lei Wang, Qian Liu, Chunyu Jing c, Jiajia Yina, Nchare Mominou, Shuzhen Li (2018). Simultaneous removal of sulfides and benzene in FCC gasoline by in situ hydrogenation over NiLaIn/ZrO2-r-Al2O3. Journal of Hazardous Materials342.758–769.
Browse journals by subject