Volume 8, Issue 5, October 2020, Page: 126-129
Effect of Organic Fertilizer Produced from Agricultural Wastes on the Growth Rate and Yield of Maize
Yusuf Haruna, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero, Birnin Kebbi, Nigeria
Aliyu Muhammad, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero, Birnin Kebbi, Nigeria
Abubakar Umar Birnin-Yauri, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero, Birnin Kebbi, Nigeria
Ahmad Rabo Sanda, Department of Soil Science, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero, Birnin Kebbi, Nigeria
Olumide Oladoja Olutayo, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero, Birnin Kebbi, Nigeria
Received: Sep. 1, 2020;       Accepted: Sep. 16, 2020;       Published: Oct. 14, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajac.20200805.12      View  29      Downloads  20
Abstract
This research was carried out to study the effect of organic fertilizer produced at different proportions by mass using same substrate made up of Neem seeds, rice husk, blood meal, bone meal, calcium carbonate in five different formulations on the growth and development of maize crop (zea mays). The constituents were prepared by mixing and blending using mixer and hammer mill respectively. Physicochemical analysis was carried out to determine the nutritive value of the formulated organic fertilizer for the presence of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium (N. P. K). The fertilizer was subjected to a pot experiment, using a complete randomized design method, in which each soil was treated with the prepared organic fertilizer formulation at high and low amount of application and planted for a period of 12 weeks. The result of physicochemical analysis of the various proportion of organic fertilizer indicated that formulation type 5 presented the highest percentage of nitrogen content (i.e. 14840 mg/kg). This was due to the increase in proportion of Poultry litters in the formulation type 5. Moreover, the formulation type 3 recorded the lowest percentage of nitrogen (i.e. 4060mg/kg). There was no significant difference (P< 0.05) in the vegetative growth of maize for various treatments. However, formulation type 5 at high amount of application gave higher values of plant height, stem girth, leaf area and number of leaves than other formulations. This implies that organic fertilizer could be potentially promising option to chemical fertilizer as a soil conditioner and a good source for plant nutrients.
Keywords
Organic Fertilizer, Formulations, Substrate, Plant, Growth, Yield etc.
To cite this article
Yusuf Haruna, Aliyu Muhammad, Abubakar Umar Birnin-Yauri, Ahmad Rabo Sanda, Olumide Oladoja Olutayo, Effect of Organic Fertilizer Produced from Agricultural Wastes on the Growth Rate and Yield of Maize, American Journal of Applied Chemistry. Vol. 8, No. 5, 2020, pp. 126-129. doi: 10.11648/j.ajac.20200805.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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